Sep 292014
 

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.


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by Anura Guruge


1. What is the longest (consecutive) period where the papacy has been under one name, albeit with different popes of that name? [#28]

2. What is the most prevalent prior name among the popes? [#30]

3. There is one pope who was born on, two who were elected on, and one that died on Christmas Day, i.e., December 25. Who were these four popes and the Christmases involved? [#55]

4. When Eugenio Maria Giuseppe Giovanni Pacelli, i.e., Pius XII (#261) was elected pope on March 2, 1939, on the second day of the conclave, on the third ballot, he became the only pope known to have been elected on his birthday – he having been born on March 2, 1876. He was thus sixty-three years old. The crowds in St. Peter’s Square waiting to see the new pope knew that it was his birthday – he a well known and beloved Roman, from ‘Black Nobility’ [i.e., aristocratic families that stood by the pope during the travails of the Italian unification]. Two other popes share that March 2nd birthday. One was born in the 19th century and the other in the 15th century. The former was an influential and famous pope while the latter is a relatively well known non-Italian who does hold a papal distinction, though it is not well known. Who are these two popes who share a March 2nd birthday with Pius XII? [#61]

5. Who was the first pope to be elected in a conclave, known to have been sequestered (under lock-and-key) per the now norm, that was held outside of Rome? [#44]

6. Who was the first pope to use an automobile to travel outside of the Vatican City? [#48]

7. When was the last time that a cardinal died in conclave? [#74]

8. That the First Council of Nicaea [325 AD] was summoned by the bestriding Constantine the Great is well known. What was to be the first ecumenical council to be convoked by a pope? [#5]

9. Which pope brought to an end the First Vatican Council [1869 to 1870] the twentieth of the councils, best known for approving the notion of papal infallibility? [#8]

10. Continuing on the topic of women in conclaves it is known that in the 17th century a woman was asked to address the cardinals, in conclave, before they started balloting. What was this conclave where a woman was invited to the conclave, at its start, to share her thoughts with the electors as to the criteria they should consider when choosing the next pope? [#76]

All these are from “Popes: 101 Facts & Trivia“. The [#n] at the end refers to the ‘bullet’ number within the book. Yes, of course, you can find each and every answer by doing your own bit of digging around. It is fun.


Sep 272014
 

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.


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by Anura Guruge


Related posts:
>>Popes: 101 Facts & Trivia” available.
>>
“John XXIII”: 4 star review by ‘Vine Voice’
>> “John XXIII”: #12 for Church Leaders
>> Just approved paperback version
>> “Pope John XXIII: 101 Facts & Trivia Book”

++++ Search on ‘pope‘  & check Category ‘Religion’  for loads of other pope related posts >>>>


cardbishopssep252014667a

Click to ENLARGE. From my now badly lapsed (but once magic) Cardinals Excel spreadsheet. But these entries hadn’t changed since 2008 – 2010 and I was able to quickly cobble-up this view — for this post. There are times, just before I drift off to sleep (around 2 am), when I think: “I really should invest a couple of days into updating that Spreadsheet BECAUSE it can show so much”.


I had a (nice) e-mail about “this” from a reader yesterday. He was concerned as to what would happen when (my MAN), (still) My Lord Tarcisio Bertone (of the multimillion dollar penthouse) turns 80 on December 2, 2014 and thus ceases to be an elector.

The short answer is: NOTHING.

Though it will be a FIRST there is nothing in Canon Law, papal edicts, Vatican lore or College of Cardinals’ tradition that says that there has to be Cardinal Bishops at a conclave to make it legit.

As far as I can see we have NEVER had a conclave without cardinal bishops. But that doesn’t mean that a conclave couldn’t happen if all the cardinal bishops were ineligible (or incapable) of attending. I started with the 9 cardinal conclave that I talk about in my latest pope book: “Popes: 101 Facts & Trivia“. There were two cardinal bishops at that conclave. Prior to the 80-year cut-off kicking-in in 1971 there was no impediments to Cardinal Bishops participating in conclaves (other than political coercion). With up to 6 cardinal bishops present, at any one time, at least one of two always made it to a conclave. Cardinal Bishop vacancies, prior to 1961 when John XXIII (#262) changed the rules, didn’t last for long because jus optionis permitted rules permitted the senior most cardinal to make a grab for it. So cardinal bishops being unable to attend conclaves ONLY became an issue post 1971 — and so far we have always managed to have some representation.

That is one of the lesser appreciated beauties of the College of Cardinals. The three hierarchical orders, cardinal bishops, cardinal priests and cardinals deacons, are PURELY ceremonial — and, yes, conclaves are when the ceremonies hit a crescendo. But we also have the sacrosanct ‘Order of Precedence’ when it comes to the College. And that is the key. No bishops … let the precedence play its role.

So was the uninitiated here is the issue. You can only have six (6) suburbicarian Cardinal Bishops — because we only have seven (7) suburbicarian (i.e., suburbs surrounding Rome) titles, and one of those, Ostia, is always given to the Dean in ADDITION to his other suburbicarian see title. While popes can easily create new Roman titles (for cardinal priests) and ‘deaconries’ (for cardinal deacons) they can’t really, without appearing to be mighty presumptuous, create NEW suburbicarian sees. The 7 we have date back to 769 CE. So there is a BIT of history here. Creating a new suburbicarian see would be a BIG deal — kind of like reenacting the Resurrection. Unlikely that even Francis would want to mess with that.

Yes, of course, one of these elderly cardinals might decide that it really was time for them to “go to their father’s house” — which is the terminology they use. Plus there is, always, what I call ‘Option B’, though the Vatican, ‘of late’, appears to be VERY skittish about opting for this option — something that they routinely resorted to during the Middle Ages.

No big deal. I, as ever, anticipating these eventualities covered it in my “Last 10 Conclaves” book, last year.

Click to ENLARGE. Use link above to order the book. Get the "Popes: 101 Facts & Trivia" while you are at it.

Click to ENLARGE. Use link above to order the book. Get the “Popes: 101 Facts & Trivia” while you are at it.


Sep 242014
 

 

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.


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by Anura Guruge


Related posts:
>>Popes: 101 Facts & Trivia” available.
>>
“John XXIII”: 4 star review by ‘Vine Voice’
>> “John XXIII”: #12 for Church Leaders
>> Just approved paperback version
>> “Pope John XXIII: 101 Facts & Trivia Book”
>> “John XXIII”: Gilford Library

++++ Check Category “Books” for more posts >>>>

>> Appointment of Blase J. Cupich
>> Pope Francis butts heads with Burke
>> Francis skullcap on eBay
>> 1st Sri Lankan Saint an Indian

++++ Search on ‘pope‘  & check Category ‘Religion’  for loads of other pope related posts >>>>


p101pbamazon1

Click to ENLARGE. Use link below to access Amazon listing for “Popes: 101 Facts & Trivia”.

Click to access Amazon listing for “Popes: 101 Facts & Trivia”.

I am old fashioned when it comes to books. As such I like to see my book in print even though I fully appreciate that the market for printed books is in decline. Thanks to Amazon’s “CreateSpace” (and others of its ilk) getting a title for ‘Print on Demand‘ costs nothing — if you do all the work (which I do). So as soon as I had the Kindle version published (along with three updates) I started working on the print version.

I wrote both the “Pope John: 101 Facts & Trivia” and “Popes: 101 Facts & Trivia” in print format rather than the free-flow, ‘no-formatting-to-speak-of’ form required by Kindle eBooks. I like tightly formatted books and as such writing in print format is more satisfying to me. And that is what counts. So once the book is finished I have to create the Kindle version by copying and pasting my formatted version into a freeflow document. To me that is easier than the other way around — i.e., adding formatting to the freeflow version.

So after the Kindle I am 80% there in terms of the print version BAR the index! I now have a semi-automated method for creating my ‘Partial Index’. I use the very powerful search capability of Adobe Acrobat to find all the occurrences of the terms I want to include in the ‘Partial Index’. But it still takes me about two days to get the index done.

I had the Kindle version up on Amazon on Wednesday night, September 17, 2014 — ahead of the Scottish referendum. Had the print version ready Saturday night — ahead of us going to the Highland Games, in Loon, on Sunday. Given that this is the 10th book I have published through CreateSpace I have learned that it just does not pay to submit your book for THEIR ‘Print Review’ over a weekend! Yes, they work 24 x 7 BUT invariably they have their “C-team” working over the weekends — and I also suspect that they get a lot of books submitted for review over weekends. I have found that the best time for getting a “CLEAN” print-review is Monday nights. So I submitted the book Monday afternoon. Yesterday, Tuesday morning, I had the Green Light. And bingo.

It was on Amazon within an hour of me approving the digital proof. That is quick. Then late last night I send a quick “please/thank you” note to Kindle asking them to link the titles — because I don’t have the patience to wait for the 72-hours or so it takes for this to happen if it is done automatically. Kindle is good to me. They linked it … by this morning … and send me a ‘smile’ e-mail saying ‘done’.

So that is where we are. The Kindle book has already sold a few copies. That is nice. I am happy. Now for the next book — though I am TRYING to FORCE myself into giving myself a couple of days break before starting. It is hard. I have to write. It is an addiction.


Sep 182014
 

Anura Guruge, June 8, 2013.

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by Anura Guruge


Related posts:
>> “John XXIII”: 4 star review by ‘Vine Voice’
>> “John XXIII”: #12 for Church Leaders
>> Just approved paperback version
>> “Pope John XXIII: 101 Facts & Trivia Book”
>> “John XXIII”: Gilford Library

++++ Check Category “Books” for more posts >>>>


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popes101amazon2ndlistingjjj


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This is a different, unusual, “Guruge-special” look at certain aspects of papal history.

There has been so much written and said about the current pope, Francis (#267), but do you know:

— who owned the Fisherman’s Ring that he now wears
(and NO, it was not a prior pope)?

— what pet he had when he was a seminarian in his twenties?
— where he stayed in Rome ahead of attending the conclave
that elected him pope?

— the ailment, other than his lung ‘problem’, that has afflicted
him since his youth?

— the ‘rubber band’ story that would make Gandhi smile?

OK. So that is the kind of slant this book takes, the obscure, unexplored and stuff that requires computer-aided analytics (my forte).

So some other examples:

— what was the very first Canon approved by an Ecumenical Council
(and it will blow you away)?

— who was the first pope, as pope, to attend an Ecumenical Council?
— what is the, unequivocally, the first recorded date in papal history?
— who was the recent pope born on Holy Saturday?
— what conclave had the youngest electorate?
— when was the last time a cardinal died within a conclave?

101 Q&As in total and at least 202, probably close to 300, nuggets of information as I tried, as I did in my prior two ‘101: Facts & Trivia‘ books, to include two, if not more, nuggets of data in each bullet.

This is a book that has been rattling in my head ever since I started doing papal research, in earnest, eight years ago. There is so much depth and breadth, not to mention the sheer volume, when it comes to papal history. I typically can’t go more than 30-minutes at a time when I am crunching through my research without going ‘Wow, fancy that’ or ‘I wonder …’. This book is the result of just ‘101’ of those ‘fancy that’ and ‘I wonder’ moments. [I had started a ‘1,001’ version of this but realized that that was even too ambitious by my standards.] In my mind I already have some of “Popes: 101 Facts & Trivia Vol. II” done. But, it has to wait. My plan is to write two ‘101’ books about sex next! Everybody tells me that sex sells and I know as much about sex, if not more, than I known of popes. Yes, I could write, without too much effort “Sex Lives of Popes: 101 Facts & Trivia” — and I might still do that. But what I have in mind for the next two books will, I think, be more exciting. That said, I tried to sneak in a quick book on the ‘College of Cardinals’ while this book was being proofed. But the two friends, one a retired judge and the other a civil servant in D.C., were too quick for me. They turned it around in less than a week. But, I still got quite a bit done of that book too. Now the challenge is NOT to go back to that BUT to start on the sex books — as soon as I get the paperback version done.

Yep. It is never ending.

So, now for the inevitable demographics:
my 3rd ‘101: Facts & Trivia’ book.
my 9th book on popes.
my 2nd book, published, in 2014.

my 22nd book as the sole-author.


Fragment of the Excel spreadsheet I compiled while doing my research into the 21 Ecumenical Councils.
This was so much fun.
So much data that I was able to extract.

Click to ENLARGE.

councilexcelscreenshot


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