Jan 262011
 

My Papabili List as of January 2011 — Sean T.

I based it on the assumption of this article, that the next Pope maybe ‘Non-Curial, with Clean Hands’.  I also based a few candidates on the assumption they may be age 75+ at the next conclave. This List takes into account the November 20, 2010 Consistory.

Oscar Maradiaga

Oscar Maradiaga

To the best of my knowledge, none of them are Curialists (or Prefects/Presidents of Curial Departments). Out of 10, 3 were created Cardinals by John Paul II while the other 7 are made cardinals by Pope Benedict XVI. The list gives the ages of the Cardinals (as of 2011) and country of origin/ethnicity.

  1. Oscar Maradiaga, 69, Honduras
  2. Odilo Scherer, 62, German ethnicity, Brazil
  3. Philippe Barbarin, 61, Moroccan-Born, France
  4. Angelo Bagnasco, 68, Italy. Archbishop of Genoa
  5. Jorge Urosa, 69, Venezuela
  6. Lluis Sistach, 74, Spain
  7. John Njue, 67, Kenya

    Lluís Martínez Sistach

  8. Raul Chiriboga, 77, Ecuador
  9. Stanislaw Dziwisz, 72, Poland
  10. Jose Policarpo, 75, Portugal

1), 3) & 10) are made Cardinals by Pope JPII and the others BXVI, so for the other 7, it will be the 1st time they will be in a conclave. Policarpo is last on my list because of recent remarks about Catholic women marrying Muslim men, which are rather controversial. So far, other Cardinals (apart from Maradiaga) are ‘clean’ and don’t have ill remarks, as far as I know.

2) an interesting part of Scherer is he is a member of the Pontifical Council for Promoting the New Evangelisation, a very new Vatican body created by BXVI. It is tasked with re-evangelising traditionally Catholic countries that are experiencing secularisation (such as the traditional European countries). For a Brazilian Cardinal with German roots to be in this Council is rather interesting. Of the 10 Papabili, he is the only Cardinal who is a member of this Council. If he becomes Pope, he will be the 1st Latin American Pope overseeing a declining European flock, and will try to stem the decline. When Pope Benedict was elected, he may have been a last-ditch defense against secularism in Europe. Cardinal Scherer will be best positioned since he is white, of European ancestry, and from the Global South of Latin America.
4), my only Italian choice, is someone nobody will see as papabile. But his background is interesting. He was made priest by Cardinal Giuseppe Siri, and consecrated bishop by Dionigi Tettamanzi. The Diocese of Genoa is interesting, because it has not produced a Pope before (unlike more famous ones like Venice or Milan).

6) will be 75 soon. He will be involved in World Youth Day this year. Again, he has never participated in a consistory, and his name is obscure. My Spanish choice for Pope.

8) is a Cardinal who is 75+ in age. He will make a ‘Transitional Pope’, or someone like Benedict when elected (though it seems Benedict is not ‘Transitional’ nowadays. I feel bad calling someone ‘Transitional’ but there has to be a better word).

10) – we have not had a Portuguese Pope for a very long time, and like mentioned in other sources he may be someone who bridges the Latin American and European blocs.

And here are the reasons why I bypassed these candidates that are mentioned in your blog:
* Many of the Italian Cardinals appointed at Nov 2010 are now Curialists.
* Leonardo Sandri (Prefect of Oriental Churches), Antonio Llovera (Prefect of Divine Worship/Sacraments), Marc Ouellet (Prefect of Cong. of Bishops), Gianfranco Ravisi (Curialist) and Peter Turkson (President of Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace) are all insiders in the Vatican, so I did not include them.

Of course, it does not mean they may not be considered. In 2005 we have a Curialist (Ratzinger, with 20+ years experience) up against a non-Curialist (Bergoglio). The future conclave may be the same showdown. Although the elections of John Paul I and John Paul II, both non-Curialists, and Paul VI, who used to be a Curialist but not in the 11 years before his election, make me think this time it will likely be a non-Curialist who will become Pope.

Please read the comments against the original post as well as those at this related papabili post.

  29 Responses to “Sean’s ‘Non-Curial, with Clean Hands’ Papabili 2011 List”

  1. I disagree with Anura and “Pater Peter” on the age of the next pope. In the 21st century so far all years but the first 2 years of B16 we have had an octogenarian pope. We only had about 10 years of that in the entire 20th century, and less than a year in the last 30 years of the same.
    Furthermore one can hardly overestimate the importance JP2’s relative youth and vitality had to do with his popularity and impact.
    The cardinals should ask themselves if the next pope should resemble the JP2 of the 80s and early 90s, or the JP2 of the 2000s, a frail, spent shadow of his former self. In other words, I do not think the cardinals will go for an old pope yet again. So I will focus on 65-70 year olds, with 1-2 years leeway in either direction (don’t want to be too rigid).
    Also, younger candidates are less likely to have been involved in the child sex scandal and its aftermath.
    I will focus on 2012 birthdays since everyone else focuses on 2011 and a 2011 sede vacante is rather unlikely anyway. Past 2012 we have another consistory with 20+ new cardinals which makes any guessing game much more unreliable.
    Most of B16’s career was either in academia and later, for almost quarter century, in the curia. he only had limited experience as archbishop of Munich and Freising (and I am not even sure if he ever served as a parish priest). I think that given the “fat pope/skinny pope” proverb, the ideal candidate will be more pastoral, with bulk of his leadership being as a leader of an archdiocese. But I also think some Vatican experience will be helpful – both because it helps the candidate understand the workings of the Vatican and because all the curial cardinals will have an easier time voting for someone they have been working with in Rome.
    All that said, here is my list, ordered by age. For each candidate, I give their country of origin, age at 2012 birthday and the current position.
    1. Angelo Scola, Italy, 71, Patriarch of Venice
    Variety of academic positions, including rector at Lateran Pontifical University, as well as a long diocesan career. Member of various curial congregations but as of yet no presidency/prefecture.
    2. Leonardo Sandri, Argentina, 69, Prefect of the Congregation for the Oriental Churches
    An exception in my list since he has no real pastoral experience to speak of. He never led a diocese, perhaps not even a parish. I included him here because of his position as the leader of the curial department dealing with oriental churches and a Latin American who was nuncio to both Venezuela and Mexico he has unique experience dealing with different kinds of people. Being able to relate and speak to the entire Catholic world will be an important asset for the next pope to have.
    3. Marc Ouellet, Canada, 68, Prefect of the Congregation of Bishops, Pontifical Commission for L. America
    Googling for “Oullet” yielded a number of images of a scantly clad, busty, blonde. Turns out she is Maryse Ouellet, a Canadian pro wrestler and model. I wonder if she is related to the cardinal. Uhm, where were we? Oh, Marc Ouellet, right. I think he brings a good mix of diocesan and curial experience. S. American links (missionary activity, recent curial appointment) will definitely be an asset.
    4. Christoph Schönborn, Austria, 67, Archbishop of Vienna, Bishop of the Byzantine Rite in Austria
    Academic career before becoming first aux. bishop and eventually archbishop of Vienna. Member of sundry curial congregations but president of none of them, yet. Interetsing and outspoken person – criticized Sodano on handling of child abuse scandal, said that priestly celibacy should be reexamined and made some comments friendly to so-called “Intelligent Design” which were attacked even by the director of the Vatican Observatory.
    5. Antonio Llovera, Spain, 67, Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship etc.
    “Little Ratzinger” has been (arch)bishop for more than 15 years before being appointed Prefect of the Congregation for Divine Worship etc. What really could hurt him was his glib statement that child sex abuse was not very serious compared to abortion.
    6. Malcolm Ranjith, Sri Lanka, 65, Archbishop of Colombo
    “Tanned Ratzinger”, as Anura calls him, served in a variety of diocesan and curial (evangelization of peoples, divine worship) as well as nuncio to Indonesia and East Timor. What role race might play is still unclear though.
    7. Peter Turkson, Ghana, 64, President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace
    If we are to have an African candidate, Turkson is currently the strongest candidate. Long time archbishop of Cape Coast, he has been appointed President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace in 2009.

    Needless to say, this is the first draft of my Papabili 2012 list, subject to revision.

  2. I do agree with Citizen of Dis, and I have expressed the same sentiments earlier too. The Church does need a younger pope particularly to appeal to younger audiences especially in North America and Europe. However, such a candidate has to be extremely charismatic, multi lingual, intellect, solid operational and strategic experience from Diplomatic to Diocese from Curia to Parish and perhaps well versed with the power of new media (could not stop thinking the pope blogging and commenting on this site!),

    I still strongly hold the opinion that the next pope will be from Europe, and not from Asia or Africa. The primary reason being, such a person may not appeal for North American or European Catholics, particularly the young. It would be a hard reality to accept for many.
    In any case, the church is still in an upward trend in Asia and Africa, and it will be unlikely that there will be protests from Catholics in these parts of the world claiming they are increasing and hence the papacy!!

    I still opt for Christoph Schönborn if there is a conclave today.
    Only time will tell whether we will be a witness to a conclave soon, but one thing is certain, this blog will be buzzing with comments and millions of hits and Anura burning the midnight oil!

  3. Hey, glad to have you back.
    Kenny, I need YOUR marketing genius. If only we could turn the millions of hits … (alas NOT yet) … into mullah.
    You have been consistent with your backing of Christoph Schönborn. Have you met him. Appears that we had a deal with some Austrian monasteries where young novices were sent to Austria for training. Appears many got to know the Cardinal quite well.
    The Cardinal Count was on my original list. I am not sure any more. But, I could be wrong.
    Thanks, Kenny.
    Cheers.

  4. Dear Father,
    Again, outstanding and I THANK YOU.
    I had characterized him as an attention seeker … BUT your word ‘opportunism’ is better. Yes, I have seen the same thin, especially about Intelligent Design. Kind of an Austrian Sara Palin! [I hope I don’t offend too many Austrians by that.]
    Father, wouldn’t you say that much of this, however, is in his blood and upbringing?
    Of course, I do not know him or met him. I only have the words of a few (other than you) who have met him. Yes, their status was different to yours. Both devout, forelock tugging Catholics — though one, as you remember, was a novice frater. But, I can see how that happens. He is condescending, as a count should be, to commoners.
    But … I go back to my central theme of this year.
    What do the electors think?
    I am totally convinced that their criteria are very different to ours. They have to be. They are a different breed, all together. This is why in my posting last night I showed a pair of dice against him. There is a CHANCE that he could muster 80 votes.
    Father, do YOU know (or can you find out) if his family is rich? If so, maybe we might see some good old, traditional conclave simony … except now at the Domus they all have their own private bathrooms, so slipping money under the common bathroom door gets a bit more complicated. But, this is the age of the Internet and PayPal.
    *******
    Yes, Citizen of Dis … I actually know MORE about the good father, including his title, name and mailing address … than we know of YOU … other than that you SEEM to hail from the Georgia Public Library System. So, PLEASE be ‘nice’ to FATHER PETER. [[ Yes, I will add a smile, too. ]]
    *******
    Thank you father. All the best.
    We are off to see a good good Christian play with flying angels and pirates … Peter Pan!

  5. Citizen,
    What did I think of YOU list. You surprised me! You have seen MY latest comparison … right?
    You and I have congruence on your first four picks … and we differ markedly on your other three … though I see where YOU are coming when it comes to the Little and Tanned Ratzingers.
    Do NOT understand why people plug for Turkson!
    Yes, the electors may want an arch, Latin Mass loving pope. In that case NOT sure why they would pick the Tanned one ahead of the Little. Somewhat atypical to his countryman, probably because he grew conflicted by his schizophrenic name, he is not known for his warm personality. But, for that matter neither is the Little — BUT the Little is European.
    Yes, I will BUY Scola. You could, without too much effort, convince me that he is my #1 rather than Ouellet.
    Scola might BE the real thing.
    Today, I intend to look at Paddy. I haven’t looked at Paddy in months.
    Thanks.

  6. Regardless of Schönborn’s personality, is it realistic to have two consecutive popes (Ratzinger and Schönborn) whose mother tongue is German?

  7. Kenny my friend and compatriot,
    You asked: “Why is the church dying in these continents and flourishing in Asia and Africa?”

    I can answer question with utmost candor BUT you won’t like it and neither will lot of others. So I will hold my peace and piece.

    Did you meet the Cardinal in Sri Lanka, Canada or Europe? But you also know Ouellet … right?

    More later, Kenny. All the best. Is it Summer in Canada yet?

    Cheers

  8. Kenny,
    everybody seems to have met the Austrian Cardinal. 😉

    About Church’s decline in the developed countries, I think that prosperity and the triumph of individual values play a great role.
    A prosperous society is not as dependent on organized religion and turns to the secular state to organize society at the macro-level. Note that institutions of the RCC grew up in the tumultuous and not very prosperous Middle Ages, in the aftermath of the demise of the Roman Empire in the West.
    Most religions, and especially RCC, have strict, and often quite antiquated, notions of personal and societal behavior (opposition to condoms by the RCC for example). Most still accept membership in the Church and participate in major rites (baptisms, weddings, funerals) but have abandoned most of the moral teachings and much of theological foundation. Others decide to go the whole way and abandon the church altogether. That decision is made more appealing in counties like Germany and Austria that have the church tax that the apostate can avoid by leaving the Church.

  9. Citizen of Dis.
    I certainly agree that the RCC has notions of personal and societal behavior that are too strict for most of the people. Contrary to you, I am never going to call anyone’s view ANTIQUATED. Calling someone’s view antiquated is a common practice of the Enlightenment and an average modern liberal in a case when it is easier to go ad hominem that to express arguments.
    You say very correctly that many people abandoned most of the moral teachings and much of theological foundation.
    Point one. I actually think that moral teachings were never followed as much as we presently like to think. However, the fact that they were not followed was an issue not much discussed. The major difference between that and the present time is that secular laws did not permit certain behavior in contrast with Christian moral teaching (as I mentioned somewhere else, I can list a handful of “fatherless” children or those born out of wedlock among my own great-grandparents or great-great grandparents or their siblings: it was the still time of Emperor Franz Joseph I in my country or Victoria/Edward VII; it is interesting, however, that my parents and grandparents, in a liberal surrounding, had all their children properly concieved in a Catholic marriage; when we mention Edward VII, he certainly kept a mistress; his son and great-son, George V and George VI didn’t, as far as I know, and it was a much more liberal time: it probably has something to do with arranged marriages).
    Point two. In Western Europe it seems that people really do not need theological or any methaphysical foundation of their existence. In my personal opinion, it is a result of the high standard and the provider state developed after WWII. No pain, no suffering, no illness, death somewhere else (in a hospital or an institution for old people). I watched my grandfather dying slowly (for a dozen of weeks) in his home and his bed, surrounded by his family. I had time to think of death and the last things and I think these events deepened my faith. It would be easier to send granddad to a hospital or an institution, visit him sometimes and make ourselves think that we (the family) did everything to enable him die with dignity, surrounded by complete strangers. What I despise mostly about the present culture of my days is that try to remove death from our presence.

  10. Do NOT understand why people plug for Turkson!

    Well, I do not think an African pope is as likely as a European or (not US) American pope, but it’s still a solid possibility – and out of them I think Turkson is still most likely, using my criteria.

    Somewhat atypical to his countryman, probably because he grew conflicted by his schizophrenic name, he is not known for his warm personality. But, for that matter neither is the Little — BUT the Little is European.

    Well European cardinals are a dime a dozen – Ranjith is one of the few prominent Asian ones. Thus it seemed right to include him just like Turkson. Europe might still be most likely pick, followed by the Americas, but there is non-negligible chance that the electors will pick an African or Asian. Conclaves can be unpredictable and there is always a first time for anything – just ask Woytila or Ratzinger too for that matter!

    Yes, I will BUY Scola. You could, without too much effort, convince me that he is my #1 rather than Ouellet.

    He is good, but doesn’t have a long “shelf life” in my opinion as I don’t think the next Pope will be much over 70.

    Today, I intend to look at Paddy. I haven’t looked at Paddy in months.

    Paddy seems to be useless. Still has Arinze as top pick while even a sede vacante during his remaining eligibility is much less likely than the odds they give to his election.

  11. My friend,
    Could you PLEASE provide true English translations of your German-speak, so that all of us who do not sprechen the deutsch [and at this stage, I can tell you a story as to what we used to be told in school, in England …. ‘… AND IF NOT … you will be talking German … BUT diplomatic as ever, I will refrain], can be sure (as much as we can … and yes, I did check the translations JUST to be sure) that you are not saying anything derogatory about us … such as: ‘Anura has blonde nose hair that he doesn’t trim.’ [OK, that comes from my memories of my childhood. We would go up to European tourists eating in restaurants and talk to them in Sinhalese. They thought it was cute and that we were asking for money. But, actually, being KIDS, all our comments appeared to relate to body air, especially in the nether regions and scratching.] I know you are much more serious than that, BUT please translate. I will add it to your comment. Yes, I know you are saying something along the lines of: ‘I had Brussels sprouts for lunch which is probably why I haven’t heard of this book because I never thought Brussels would ever sprout especially with me living in the US and drinking diluted Dutch beer from a cracked stein’. Was that close?
    [[ smile ]]
    Cheers

  12. Well said. I would have gone further but you said 60% of what I would have said.
    I am not sure whether people will still fully get what you are saying, BUT it is a good start.
    I will confess, I had FORGOTTEN about Church Tax. Here is a link.
    I checked Austria. Only Catholics taxed!
    This is a GREAT idea. I am surprised that we haven’t embraced this notion here (though I live in the INCORRECTLY named ‘tax-free’ NH). Who will object. Wow. I like it. 8% to 9%. Wow. We pay that every-time we buy any prepared food, even a muffin. Meals and board tax. I love it. I love it. Citizen do YOU have any political aspirations … like running for President in 2012. This could be GREAT PLATFORM. You can be the Republican candidate FOR Church Tax.
    ******
    Well, I have not met the Austrian cardinal or for that matter any cardinal that I am aware of … though there is a fairly good chance that I might have met Cooray without realizing that he was a cardinal. Talking of which, my dear friend, Salvador, has managed to butcher the name of my country. We are all used to having OUR names butchered … but ‘Shii Lanka’ … here. Yes, I should tell him, but, of late, I try not to bother him unless it is beyond urgent … and this isn’t. It is just funny … especially the kind of Freudian sound of it. I am JUST hoping that Salvador just meant to say ‘She Lanka’ — which is fine — especially given that we are the nation of the First Female Prime Minister.
    Cheers

  13. Thank you, dear father,
    Father, I am SORRY … but sometimes (OK, maybe OFTEN), I like to tease Citizen. I actually translated the German (using Google) and knew … roughly … what it said. I was just winding him up. I did NOT mean to distress you.
    *****
    Father, I ended up reading up about Church Tax. I had heard of it, but had forgotten about it.
    All I can say is WOW.
    Yes, I remember reading about the pre-WW II Church school system etc.
    The 1.1% in Austria seems ‘manageable.’ The 8% to 9% in Germany seems mind blowing. I assume that you can deduct taxes paid to the church from your other tax obligations.
    There is tithing here, but that seems different.
    I also guess the tax is independent of the weekly collections at church.
    Very interesting.
    Father you must have heard that over here people ‘hate’ taxes. You must have heard about the ‘Bush era tax cuts’ extended … even to the richest Americans etc.
    There is a fundamental difference in attitude when it comes to taxation between Europe and here.
    They are now talking about limiting future social security payments. It all boils down to the aversion to paying taxes.
    Of late, I have become a great adherent of Michener. He was a believer that paying taxes was a privilege BECAUSE you needed to have made the money in the first place in order to owe taxes.
    Well … per an earlier promise … we should TRY and stay away from too much secular politics because a few of us can really start going hammer-and-tongs about issues such as taxes, health care etc.
    All the best father. Hope you are feeling better. I am waiting for the snow to stop to start my first round of shoveling.
    Thank you.

  14. ‘She Lanka’…that’s something I have never heard before! Good one Anura!
    Now that you asked, I met the cardinal in Sri Lanka, and he invited me to visit his Cathedral, and very very strange enough, the following year, on a totally unplanned visit, I did end up in Vienna, visiting St. Stephen’s Cathedral!

    Citizen of Dis and Marko, thank you for your views. I also lean towards the ‘providing state’ theory. Often people in Europe and North America, because the state does provide, God or religion has very little relevance, both on moral vales and on faith. Everything is systemized.
    However, the moment, instability occurs everyone rushes to the churches. 9/11 was an excellent example of such an event.

    In contrast, in Asia and Africa, where the majority do not enjoy the benefits of a providing state, God is seen as the ‘ultimate provider’, everything depends and revolves around faith. Indeed the beatitude on the poor holds true.

    Which brings me to raise the next question:

    In the shoes of a cardinal in Europe or in North America, what would you do to reverse the eroding situation? (Other than electing a younger pope)

  15. I certainly agree that the RCC has notions of personal and societal behavior that are too strict for most of the people. Contrary to you, I am never going to call anyone’s view ANTIQUATED. Calling someone’s view antiquated is a common practice of the Enlightenment and an average modern liberal in a case when it is easier to go ad hominem that to express arguments.

    It is definitely not ad hominem as I am describing moral systems, not attacking any persons.
    I still think the description of Church’s morality – especially sexual morality – is antiquated. Meaning, it is not only old, but that it no longer fits the real world well because it has changed so much over the centuries while the Church has refused to budge on key issues.
    I argued the same thing in our discussion about condoms (you never replied to my last retort there).

    You say very correctly that many peopleabandoned most of the moral teachings and much of theological foundation.
    Point one. I actually think that moral teachings were never followed as much as we presently like to think.

    Yes, humans always had urges (which I think are legitimate) and found ways to fulfill them, but it was usually done in secret. Now, in the developed countries of the West, most of it is in open. The reason is because the world has changed in fundamental ways. Take premarital sex. It is easy to see why premarital sex would be prohibited and frowned upon in pre-modern societies. In the absence of reliable birth control pregnancy is a real danger, as are STDs, which were a much more serious threat before modern medicine. In the absence of paternity testing the young mother and her family often bore the responsibility of raising the child. Because men wanted to be sure a child conceived in marriage is theirs, premarital virginity in women was demanded and female fidelity enforced by limiting women’s role in society.
    Those things no longer apply and it is thus not hard to see why premarital sex is largely seen as absolutely normal. The only people who say it is immoral are those that say it for religious reasons – but those religious reasons are ancient practical reasons that have in time become encoded as religious values and remained fixed, yes I would say even fossilized, long after these practical reasons ceased to be relevant. Hence I say these values are antiquated.

    it is interesting, however, that my parents and grandparents, in a liberal surrounding, had all their children properly concieved in a Catholic marriage;

    Maybe not so unusual given the fact that by the time (you are in your 30s, right?) you were conceived the pill was readily available and even when your grandparents were getting busy relatively reliable and affordable condoms were available. That can’t necessarily be said for generations before them.

    when we mention Edward VII, he certainly kept a mistress; his son and great-son, George V and George VI didn’t, as far as I know, and it was a much more liberal time: it probably has something to do with arranged marriages).

    Probably so.

    Point two. In Western Europe it seems that people really do not need theological or any methaphysical foundation of their existence. In my personal opinion, it is a result of the high standard and the provider state developed after WWII. No pain, no suffering, no illness, death somewhere else (in a hospital or an institution for old people).

    That is a very good point. But I see that as a great positive, not a negative as you appear to (and I am sorry if I misunderstood you).

    What I despise mostly about the present culture of my days is that try to remove death from our presence.

    I see the value to die surrounded by loved ones rather than strangers, and I do see value in loved ones to spend more time with a dying grandfather. But on the flipside, I do not see much use in death being a constant presence. In fact, I think it is a curse of our intelligence as species that we become so aware of our own eventual mortality.

  16. This is a GREAT idea. I am surprised that we haven’t embraced this notion here (though I live in the INCORRECTLY named ‘tax-free’ NH).

    Separation of church and state would make it impossible for state to collect church funds in the US. It would also necessitate IRS keeping tabs on everyone’s church membership. And lastly, it is practical in a country with a few major churches, but in US where there are tens of thousands of Protestant denominations and independent, non-denominational churches it would be impossible.

    Who will object. Wow. I like it. 8% to 9%. Wow. We pay that every-time we buy any prepared food, even a muffin. Meals and board tax. I love it. I love it.

    Note that church tax is not instead of the sales tax (known as VAT, value added tax, in Europe), which is higher anyway (17% in Germany I believe).

    Citizen do YOU have any political aspirations … like running for President in 2012. This could be GREAT PLATFORM. You can be the Republican candidate FOR Church Tax.

    Haha, but no. Besides, I would have to call Obama and ask him where he got his Hawaii birth certificate made first. :p

    It is just funny … especially the kind of Freudian sound of it. I am JUST hoping that Salvador just meant to say ‘She Lanka’ — which is fine — especially given that we are the nation of the First Female Prime Minister.

    She Lanka sounds like a name for a Masters of the Universe heroine. 😉

  17. However, the moment, instability occurs everyone rushes to the churches. 9/11 was an excellent example of such an event.

    Everyone? Sure, there was a rush on churches for a month or two after 9/11, but that was mostly in the US, which is thoroughly religious anyway. I do not believe churches in UK or Netherlands were (much) less empty than usual. Am I wrong there?

    In the shoes of a cardinal in Europe or in North America, what would you do to reverse the eroding situation? (Other than electing a younger pope)

    I am not sure. It really is an intractable question, given that the Catholic Church is global in nature. It has opposing challenges in the developed vs. developing world – secularism and liberalism in the former, evangelical and charismatic Christianity in the former. The Church cannot bend enough to satisfy both pressures. It will have to chose (and the current choice is clearly to appeal to more conservative Global South) or else break apart like the Anglican Church is in the process of. So it might be that there is no solution – Catholic Church might resign itself to be less and less relevant in Europe and other developed countries. Which raises the question, how long until the leadership is majority non-Western? And will there in a century or two be a move of the Headquarters away from Rome in a century or two – or will Vatican remain the seat of largely non-Western Catholicism even in the midst of thoroughly post-Christian Europe, kind of like Ecumenical Patriarchate of Constantinople in Muslim Turkey.

  18. I get e-mails from him [i.e., Obama] ALL the time — don’t you?
    Next time I get one and I will forward it you … then you can reply to it with any queries you have. [A tip. It helps if YOU include a pledge for a donation.]
    Cheers.

  19. There are papabili and papal resignation related comments by Father Anthony, from February 3 & 5, 2011, against this post: http://popes-and-papacy.com/wordpress/?p=2132#comments.
    They are very germane and you might want to look at them.

  20. I think that the time has come for a non-curialist to be elected as the deputy of Christ. but all indications are pointing towards the election of the Archbishop of Milan as the next pontiff. it is evident that cardinal Angelo Scola will be our pope………he is the pope of our time, a pope of the youth and scholars. his recent posting in Milan is reason enough for us to believe that Pope Benedict XVI favors him as his his successor as the Bishop of Rome……………

  21. Interesting. Very interesting. Angelo Scola is #4 in my latest 2011 papabili list as it appears in ‘The Next Pope 2011.
    He was #5 in my 2009 list. So he has gone up 1 place.
    But, it is interesting that my top 3, above Scola, are all curialist, though I had favored Ouellet even before his latest post in Rome. I still think Ouellet can get more votes than Scola, and that Scola will ONLY get elected if Ouellet decides to be is ‘king maker’ and gets his backers to vote for Scola.
    Thank you.

  22. Today’s Vatican news bulletin has a batch of appointments and a remarkable note that the Pope has imposed the pallium for Milan on Cardinal Scola at Castel Gandolfo,rather than making him wait for the worldwide ceremony at the Vatican next June.(It’s a curious practice that a pallium is neither handed on between holders of a metropolitan see,nor kept when a metropolitan archbishop moves from one see to another,but a new one is procured from the wool of those blessed-then-slaughtered-and-eaten lambs each time man or office changes).Rocco Palmo is “Whispering” (well,Tweeting,he hasn’t blogged) that this marks Scola as B XVI’s chosen successor,but there are no sure things).

  23. Thank YOU. I saw that, but unlike you, given that I was even more hurried than usual, failed to notice the Gandolfo twist. THANK YOU.
    Yes, somebody else, from Italy, I think, commented, earlier today, that Scola is the anointed. I still think it is Ouellet.
    Updated College stuff re. De Paolis.
    Also wrote another post re. pope’s visit to the motherland.
    NOW have to go set up a new aquarium. Old one broke last night when I was cleaning it. No we didn’t eat the fish.
    Thanks. Cheers.

  24. Louis,
    I am not 100% sure whether the blessed two lambs are slaughtered and eaten right away. From what I can see they are given back to Trappist monks who raised them … for retirement? Yes, at some stage, as with all lambs (even if they were girlfriends at some stage), they probably get eaten. But, I think there is a dignified hiatus between the year of the blessing and the chop.
    I guess you must eat some mutton. Funny thing that … ‘mutton.’ In Ceylon what we call mutton is GOAT meat, not lamb. Lamb is called lamb. I like real mutton. Tangy taste. I think goat mutton is readily available in New York. Not that easy here.
    Thanks. Cheers,
    Anura

  25. The lambs are blessed in January,the wool is used for the pallia presented in June,but I believe the lambs are slaughtered and eaten for the intervening Easter.

  26. I did a quick check. Could not find anything about the slaughter. Slaughter for Easter makes sense, though wouldn’t goats be better — a scrape goat for Easter.
    Thanks. Happy New Year? Your holidays are always a mystery to me. Yes, over the years, many have tried to explain. But, I still lose track. Cheers.

  27. Now what do we need to do to close the italics on this topic’s comments?…I tried opening my last comment with a virgule-I but that didn’t work.

  28. Louis,
    I had a look. There are NO settings at my end, as far as I can see, that has ended comments against this post.
    ******
    I just did a Scola pallium post giving YOU credit. Have a look.
    Thanks. Cheers

  29. Louis,
    Since I see comments in a different window, i.e., Admin’s Comment Admin page, I do NOT see the italics.
    So EARLIER I wasn’t sure what you were saying.
    I then realized LATER. Had a look.
    It was a Feb. 1, 2011 from Dr. Marko B. — who has now gone missing.
    Two stray, virgule-I. FIXED it.
    It had to be fixed at the first source it was wasn’t matched. DONE. Thanks. Sorry.
    Cheers

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